Getting the balance right at work

Thinking about some of the Christmas presents I have enjoyed most in the past couple of weeks, I’ve noticed a pattern. I’ve loved listening to new CDs, using my new phone to listen to music during down-time, and playing the piano (I got the sheet music for the theme tune to Downton Abbey and I’m aiming to be as proficient as the pianist in this link!)

The common theme is obviously music; I hadn’t realised how much I’d been missing it in my life.

Getting the balance right in our personal lives is a very individual thing. What one person needs to feel in balance is probably quite different to the next person, and even the people you live with. This applies to our working lives too.

The Wheel of Life is a common coaching tool used to measure your satisfaction with different areas of your life, seeing where there’s an imbalance, and identify potential areas for development. Looking at the typical Wheel of Life – Career is only one part of the big picture, and it’s important that we get an appropriate balance for ourselves in this big picture.

But if you were to create a Wheel of Work for yourself, to ensure there’s suitable balance in your working life, what would it look like?

Here’s a version of the Wheel of Work which I’ve adapted and used with Team leaders. They can adapt it as they see fit, changing headings to reflect their priorities and role.

So, if you were to examine your balance at work, which headings would you use?

On a scale of 1-10, how would you score yourself for each area?

(Photo credit: renjith krishnan)

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