Posts Tagged ‘coaching relationship’

I’m a qualified coach – why would I need my own coach?

March 14, 2011

I am an experienced and qualified coach, and yet I have my own coach. Why?

There are 3 main reasons:

  1. It keeps me on track with good coaching practice
  2. Having my own coach accelerates my progress
  3. It provides useful objectivity that I can’t totally provide for myself when working on challenges and growth areas

I’ll come back to point 1 shortly. Points 2 and 3 are valid reasons why anyone should have a coach. You can often ‘get there’ on your own, but it could take a long time and you could give up out of frustration or lack of belief it will happen.

You might argue that coaches have the skills and tools necessary to coach themselves. It’s true they have a certain advantage over those without coaching training, but I return to point 3 above, and state that you can be too close to the situation to really see it clearly. I find that coaching provides me with that objective clarity I seek to ensure a more successful outcome.

Over the course of my time working as a professional and personal coach I have employed 3 types of coaches:

  • A life coach – to help me with my ongoing personal development
  • A social media coach – to get me started on different social media platforms (she is also a qualified life coach)
  • A business coach – to give me clarity and focus in my business, through its changes and challenges

The first two have also doubled up as supervision coaches to ensure I maintain good coaching practices (point 1 above); and all have contributed to my own personal and professional development in some way. One of the most important aspects of quality control for my business is to continually develop my coaching skills, and regular supervision sessions are key to this.

There are a variety of coaches today, many of whom will specialise in a particular business/organisational sector or a particular development area, such as confidence building, stress management, or leadership development. When looking for a coach, it’s important that you choose the one that best serves your needs and who you can develop good rapport with quickly.

If you are a coach:

  • how often do you use the services of another coach?
  • what type of coach do you use?
  • what benefits do you find?
  • do you prefer 1-1 supervision or group supervision sessions?

The importance of building rapport

February 7, 2011

28 Day Blog Challenge – Day 7

It’s very important for coaches to build rapport with their clients, and quickly.

In everyday life we know how it can be easier to ‘get on with’ some people more easily than others, hence the saying:

“People like people like themselves”

This doesn’t necessarily mean they need to share common interests, it’s more about sharing common values. In coaching, the aim is not for the coach and their client (coachee) to become friends, it’s about the coach enabling and supporting the coachee towards achievement of their goals. A key part of this is developing a bond of trust which, I believe, comes from having good rapport and an open/honest relationship.

Listening at a deep level is crucial to this process, and my clients regularly comment that one of the benefits of coaching is being really listened to.

As a coach, if you’re not in rapport with your coachee, and you need to challenge their thinking to move them forward, you risk losing the valuable bond you share. As a result, they don’t trust that the challenge is in their best interests, and you end up having to work hard to re-build rapport.

In my various coaching trainings, I have explored a range of methods for building rapport. But at the end of the day, most success in building relationships with clients has come from using intuition, instinct, listening at a deep level, and providing appropriate feed back.

How do you build rapport with people on a daily basis?

If you’re a teacher, how do you build rapport with the children?

If you manage a team, how do you build rapport with them? Is it different for each member?


(Picture courtesy of Renjith Krishnan)