Posts Tagged ‘target’

Motivate me! (Part 2)

February 3, 2012

So … how do you know that you’ve done a good job? In Part 1 I posed this question and encouraged you to answer it as fully as possible, and in relation to a particular work-based target. If you’ve not read Part 1, or answered the question yet, I suggest you take a moment to do so now – before you read on!

So how did you answer it? Were your answers along the lines of ‘Style A’ …

  • I just know!
  • I feel it
  • I achieve my targets
  • I achieve what I set out to do
  • I measure my progress against my success criteria

Or were they more like ‘Style B’ …

  • People tell me
  • I get great results / earn more money
  • I get good feedback from colleagues / clients
  • I find out during my performance management / appraisal meetings
  • I can see my team members are happy / succeeding / achieving great results

Or perhaps your answers were a bit of both!

There is no right or wrong here. Your preferred motivation style just is what it is. Take a look at the language you used to answer the question. Did you use more ‘I’ or ‘me’ language, or did you refer to others / external sources of feedback?

Results! ….

Style A = Internal motivation

If you’re internally motivated – you don’t need external praise and will tend to make your own decisions about the quality of your work, rather than asking other people what they think.

Your motivation is self-generated, and you rely on your own judgment when deciding what to do.

You also have a tendency to resist others telling you what to do. As you don’t generally need praise from others – you tend not to give feedback, which can be difficult if you’re a team leader or manager, and your team are more externally motivated (see below).

Style B = External motivation

You rely on recognition / feedback from others and rewards.

You’re more motivated when someone else makes the decision (e.g. on how to move forward with a team project).

You generally make reference to external sources (other people / information from elsewhere) to make the judgment on how well you’re doing.

If you don’t get sufficient feedback you won’t know how well you’re doing, and this will have a negative impact on your motivation levels. Feedback from others can also come from non-verbal / body language sources.

Using these results to motivate your team

These results will help you to identify your own preferred style (for internal/external). The next step is to use the information from both of these posts to identify your team members’ styles.

1. Pay attention to how they respond to feedback and / or how often they come to you / others seeking approval for their actions.

2. If unsure, or you can’t find sufficient evidence, ask them the question I posed in Part 1, or ask who they involve when making a decision. If they mainly refer to others, they will be more externally motivated. If they mainly talk about being able to make the decision on their own, they are more likely to be internally motivated.

3. Motivate ‘internal’ staff with phrases such as:

– “This is the target we’re aiming for. I could make some suggestions to achieve it, but at the end of the day, only you can decide the best way forward.”

– “What do you think are the steps we could take to achieve _______?”

4. Motivate ‘external’ staff with phrases such as:

– “When you complete this project on time, others will notice / you’ll get good feedback.”

– “I would strongly recommend that you (make the changes we discussed at the last staff meeting, by Friday … etc.)”

– “Think of the results you’ll get if you do ______ !”

About 40% of people are largely internally or externally motivated; and 20% are equally both. However, in a particular job sector, you may get a higher percentage of one type, due to the nature of the job.

So how did you fair … and what steps are you going to take regarding motivating your team? In my experience, leaders tend to be more internally motivated. They need to have that internal driver and a strong sense of knowing what they want and how to get there.

Would love to hear your comments on this!

(Picture credit: David Castillo Dominici)

From Comfort Zone to Panic Zone

February 4, 2011

28 Day Blog Challenge – Day 4

Where does your goal sit?

… Comfort zone, stretch zone or panic zone?

  • Does working towards your goal feel very comfortable to you?
  • Does it challenge you so that you feel it’s stretching your skills / knowledge / talent?
  • Or are you totally panicked at the thought of working on your goal?

For a goal to excite, interest, grab and motivate you it needs to stretch you. Setting goals and targets are about moving you / your team forward, making improvements, trying new things, extending skills, etc.

If your goal is too challenging or too scary, something needs to be adjusted – to bring it back into the stretch zone, and thus, more achievable.

Try this …

  • Draw yourself 3 concentric circles like the ones above
  • Start listing things that you do, which feel comfortable to you, in the Comfort Zone; everyday stuff, activities you’re confident with
  • Then list things that totally panic you in the Panic Zone. A common one for people is public speaking / running big meetings (theseĀ  are work examples, but your list doesn’t need to contain purely work-related things)
  • Finally, consider what activities lie between the two, and could go in the Stretch Zone; perhaps some new things you are trying: a new hobby, using some new equipment, learning a new skill … Ensure your goals for this year are in this list and are stretching you!

Remember – what is in one person’s panic zone may be a comfort zone task for someone else. As you set and achieve stretching goals, the list of things in your comfort zone will expand, and you will see that what previously may have seemed impossible is now within reach.

Have fun stretching!